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Thread: film algae on glass ,,again..

  1. #21
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    Re: film algae on glass ,,again..

    I mean TOC. Corals actually do consume DOC, especially softies.

  2. #22

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    Re: film algae on glass ,,again..

    This is a fairly interesting read. SM, got any nice papers on TOC and Coral's ?

  3. #23

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    Re: film algae on glass ,,again..

    got any definitions of TOC or DOC? examples? never gave them a second thought after switching to a scrubber..

  4. #24
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    Re: film algae on glass ,,again..

    First thing to remember is that amino's, vitamins, and liquid coral food (the things that reefers buy and feed their corals) are TOC/DOC. And also, bacteria (which feeds corals too) is part of TOC. But look here for more info:


    Close coupling between release and uptake of dissolved free amino acids in seawater studied by an isotope dilution approach. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 1987
    http://www.int-res.com/articles/meps/37/m037p045.pdf

    Periphytonic and benthic microflora on the reef: biomass and metabolic rates. Proceedings of the Fourth International Coral Reef Symposium, 1981:
    http://www.reefbase.org/download/downlo ... docid=9422

    Biomass, production and heterotrophic activity of bacterioplankton in the Great Astrolabe Reef lagoon (Fiji). Coral Reefs, 1999.
    http://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/exl ... 022033.pdf

    Online photochemical oxidation and flow injection conductivity determination of Dissolved Organic Carbon [DOC] in estuarine and coastal waters. The University of the South Pacific Library, 1999.
    http://www.reefbase.org/download/downlo ... 00004783_1

    Short-term variability of photosynthetic parameters and particulate and dissolved primary production in the Alboran Sea (SW Mediterranean). Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2001. (make special note of figure 7).
    http://www.int-res.com/articles/meps/212/m212p053.pdf

    Partitioning of phytoplanktonic organic carbon production and bacterial production along a coastal offshore gradient in the NE Atlantic during different hydrographic regimes. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY, 2002.
    http://www.int-res.com/articles/ame2002/29/a029p239.pdf

    Phytoplankton-bacteria interactions: an apparent paradox? Analysis of a model system with both competition and commensalism. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 1985
    http://www.int-res.com/articles/meps/25/m025p023.pdf

    Bacterioplankton carbon growth yield and DOC turnover in some coral reef lagoons. Proceedings of the 8th International Coral Reef Symposium, 1997.
    http://www.reefbase.org/download/downlo ... 00001879_1

    Linkage of small-scale spatial variations in DOC, inorganic nutrients and bacterioplankton growth with different coral reef water types, Aquatic Microbial Ecology, march 2001
    http://www.int-res.com/articles/ame/24/a024p017.pdf


    Let's not forget CoralScience.org

    And of course you can search others for yourself:

    Easiest to understand:

    http://www.reefbase.org/resource_center ... /main.aspx
    http://Int-res.com/site-service/search

    Other free ones:

    http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/goto ... sSearch.do
    http://plankt.oxfordjournals.org/content/by/year (journal of plankton research)
    http://tos.org/oceanography/issues/archive.html
    http://aslo.org/lo/search.html
    http://bioone.org/search/advanced
    http://Escholarship.org
    http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/general/lib/CREWS/

    Paid ones:

    http://bioone.org/loi/jnbs (N. American Benthological Assoc.)
    http://jstor.org/action/showPublication ... merbentsoc (N. American Benthological Ass.)
    1986-2009
    http://springerlink.com/content/100407 (Coral Reefs)
    http://springerlink.com/content/100441 (Marine Biology)
    http://www3.Interscience.wiley.com/search/allsearch
    http://Sciencedirect.com
    http://publish.csiro.au/nid/176/act/search_advanced.htm
    http://esajournals.org/search/advanced
    http://reference-global.com

  5. #25

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    Re: film algae on glass ,,again..

    I still get growth on my glass every 2-3 days. I have unmeasurable N & P for a long time. The display is now clean, and mostly my SPS are happy after I restarted. There is a tiny patch of very short green algae on a rock, which is already receding, The screen is growing 50 cm long hairs in 5 days, (No really, I'm not joking. The grow from top of the screen and all the way down 20-30cm in the water), but the growth is "lighter" as in not dark deep green, than it used to be prior to the restart. The flow and light conditions are the same, only now I skim and use GAC 24/7.

    My SPS are far more happy once I clean the screen. Why?

  6. #26
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    Re: film algae on glass ,,again..

    More particles in the water.

  7. #27

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    film algae on glass ,,again..

    And the glass? I'm about to give up on this after a year of trying. Might be my scrubber is not strong enough, but then I would not be able to make a stronger one. Can't feed more as that would give algae in Dt

  8. #28
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    Re: film algae on glass ,,again..

    Glass will always need cleaning; just less. If there is any growth on your rocks, then P is still coming out of the rocks and is keeping some P in the water which feeds the glass. After the P is low enough in the rocks, the glass will stay clean longer (unless you feed liquids).

  9. #29

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    Re: film algae on glass ,,again..

    Or it could mean the algae is releasing too much doc into the water just before the screen is cleaned because less of it's energy goes into growing. This has been shown to starve corals of oxygen due to increased microbial growth on the coral surface.
    Maybe you should clean your screen more often to keep it more like a nicely trimmed lawn as on a reel reef. Sorry for the lawn analogy, it is a British obsession!

  10. #30

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    Re: film algae on glass ,,again..

    Quote Originally Posted by dtyharry
    Or it could mean the algae is releasing too much doc into the water just before the screen is cleaned because less of it's energy goes into growing. This has been shown to starve corals of oxygen due to increased microbial growth on the coral surface.
    Maybe you should clean your screen more often to keep it more like a nicely trimmed lawn as on a reel reef. Sorry for the lawn analogy, it is a British obsession!
    It does seem this is more viable since there has been the last week 0 zero algae growth on the rocks, and the glass looks more like a slime layer than algae layer. I currently clean the screen every 5th day, at wich point most of it is so full of long green strains that I feel it needs to be done.

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