+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Violet edge of spectrum and algae

  1. #1
    kotlec's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Lithuania
    Posts
    710

    Violet edge of spectrum and algae

    Exoing to Aces findings I also found interesting .

    http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/sh...9&postcount=11

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Uk! England
    Posts
    1,212
    Kotlec - I suggested a hidden benefit of uv ish light with algae, ace was talking about bacteria I believe. However didn't manage to convince myself of any benefit. There is always a chance that high energy light is releasing bound phosphate from waterborne organics which in turn supplies free phosphate for algae growth. Uv filters could be used for this benefit in phosphate limited systems. However, the current problems raised seem to be excessive phosphate. Encouraging this binding process and skimming it out may be a benefit as far as I can tell. However this is not addressing the causes.

  3. #3
    kotlec's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Lithuania
    Posts
    710
    If really 420nm encourages better algae growth, we can use it for scrubber lighting. What guy discovered for his tank , could be useful for stronger scrubbing. I dont expect him lying about algae incursion . Also I cant remember anyone trying this spectrum for ATS.

    I have 0.02-0.03 P in my tank and very small amount of N. But corals are brownish and there are some GHA, so Im looking for ways to make scrubber stronger.

    I also have one concern regarding bacteria. I am in no way expert , just remember somebody saying that bacteria dont live or dont multiply (cant remember now) in water column , but on different surfaces instead. So wouldn't it also benefit lighting ATS with bacteria beloved spectrum and making better home for them ?

  4. #4
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    9,807
    Remember that if your scrubber is strong, and is pulling P out of the rocks, that P is going to hit your corals first and make them brown before the P gets to your scrubber. This will happen until the P is gone from the rocks (weeks to months).

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    940
    I have no doubt that 420-430nm light really benefits algae growth. My issue isn't algae growth though. My feeling with algae is I am 'maxing' out its capabilities on my systems and unfortunately that leads to excess phosphates. The reason I feel I am maxing out the benefit of the algae is because I always have rock solid 0 nitrates. This is causing an imbalance in my tanks because with solid 0 nitrates (no matter how much food I dump in) my phosphates still rise.

    Like Garf mentioned in the other thread, adding a lot of 430nm and below lighting over a display doesn't seem to be the best route to go as it can possibly lead to bacteria blooms throughout the tank like he experienced, or macro algae blooms like the person in the link above experienced. So far I have not experienced that myself with my LEDs, but my thinking when I added them to the display was to help the zooxanthellae in the corals. I wasn't really doing it for the purpose of bacteria or macro algae growth, although on my systems (and remember, every system is very different) it seems to be providing a positive benefit because my P levels seem to have slowly gone down on their own, for the first time ever since implementing an ATS (4 YEARS!). I have very little rock, which was cooked by me for 12 months and tested 0/0 before I used it in my display and lots of corals, which is why the actinic LEDs may be helping my system more than someone who has less coral.

    It is true, the majority of bacteria will colonize on surfaces and not in the water column (which is why plastic tubing in a reactor seems like an ideal location for bacteria to colonize), but an ATS run system is slightly different than say a system that uses cheato in respect that I believe on an ATS system there are a lot more algae cells moving though the system. If you have more free floating algae cells my theory is it may be possible to raise bacteria levels within the water column slightly higher than on other types of systems due to the fact there is something in the water column (albeit microscopic) for the bacteria to colonize on. I worry about using the lower/higher spectrums on an ATS/UAS though because it seems to me that would create 2 processes happening at the same location and I don't think that is the best idea. I want the algae to work and do all it can without bacteria colonizing on the algae in large numbers to the point it eats the algae on the screen (which is what I felt partially happened when I tried bio-pellets in a different type of process, not lighting related, just super bacteria bloom related that covered every surface it could).

    Just my thoughts... but I am certainly not trying to make any claims I have anything beyond a theory at this time to which I will experiment with my own tanks on before I would ever recommend anyone else try what I am trying.

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Uk! England
    Posts
    1,212
    Not disagreeing with anything here but I did not have a bacterial bloom. Just think the uv light I tried showed up the water column bacteria. May not even be the bacteria because in the air, the was a haze around the tube !

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    940
    Bacteria blooms are pretty easy to spot visually. Milky water AND a white sticky film on the glass and other items in the tank. If you were not getting a white sticky film then it probably wasn't bacteria you were seeing.

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Uk! England
    Posts
    1,212
    Ace - I think we're are like red and blue, totally different wavelengths. Like you though. Keep your ideas coming.

    Edit - apologies here, thought everyone was talking about uv ish light, not the blue that is defined by 420 to 430nm. Note to self, must pay more attention. I also agree a benefit here as I have posted previously due to secondary carotenoid photosynthesis along with chlorophyll a absorbency.

  9. #9
    kotlec's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Lithuania
    Posts
    710
    Quote Originally Posted by SantaMonica View Post
    Remember that if your scrubber is strong, and is pulling P out of the rocks, that P is going to hit your corals first and make them brown before the P gets to your scrubber. This will happen until the P is gone from the rocks (weeks to months).
    Its already nearly 2 years and it is not changing. I dont thing my patience is problem in this case. Should be something else.


    Ace , why it is problem to run small bag of gfo and solve rising P problem ? I have like a teaspoon on my 16 gallon tank and P usually is hardly detectable on Hanna.

  10. #10
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    940
    Because GFO cost $ and requires bi-monthly replacement.. my end goal is to create a natural self sustaining SPS reef tank without the need for additional media I need to replace often. That is really the only reason for me not wanting to use GFO any longer.. otherwise it is a great choice for many people. When I use GFO I have to use 1 cup worth at a time and replace it every 7 days... it gets expensive over time, especially when I don't spend the time/energy to recharge it. A few months ago I switched to Phosguard, bought a $60 "bucket" of it, and between my 2 tanks and having to replace it every 3-4 days it only lasted me 1 month. I have even gotten to the point I have dosed Lanthanum in my tanks to reduce phosphates.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts